Slip storage

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Curwen
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Slip storage

Post by Curwen » Fri Mar 22, 2019 8:45 am

Hello,

Tomorrow morning, Saudades, is getting launched and being put into a slip for the summer.

I have two questions:

1) For those who moor their boats, what do you find handy to leave/keep on your boat? We freeze dry a lot of our food, so a big Yeti thermos of hot water is enough to heat/cook our food. I keep a butane stove on board in the rare need of needing to cook/heat something. I expect to have a couple of bins of food/snacks on board as well as lots of water. There will be sweatshirts and sleeping bags and sunscreen.

2) Any tips on how to tie off in the slip? I don't have a cleat midships so spring lines are off the list unless I add a midships cleat. Has anyone mounted a midships cleat and was it useful? My plan for now is to secure the bow with lines going to each side of the slip and to secure the stern using the two stern cleats with the stern lines crossing in the shape of an X....the starboard boat cleat will be connected to the port slip cleat and the starboard slip cleat will be connected to the port boat cleat. I will have bumpers on both sides. Am I missing anything important?

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Tomfoolery
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Re: Slip storage

Post by Tomfoolery » Fri Mar 22, 2019 9:16 am

Curwen wrote:2) Any tips on how to tie off in the slip? I don't have a cleat midships so spring lines are off the list unless I add a midships cleat.
My slip has a midship cleat, so I run a spring line from the bow cleat to that to serve as a spring. The stern line is something like 45 degrees off vertical, and is the only thing keeping the boat from being blown forward into the dock (bow-first docking), so I use the forward spring to take load off the stern line. It only has to keep the stern from moving away from the dock. I use a rubber snubber on it, too, since it's so short (not much stretch to it).

Bow lines flare out in a big vee to hold the bow against sideways motion, and to keep the boat from moving backward out of the slip. But if a big blow is coming, I can add a stern spring line to that same mid-dock cleat.

The spring(s) do most of the work, since the wind is almost always from the stern (out of the north) and sometimes the bow.

Oh, and this is a floating dock, by the way. Not clear on what you have to work with, though.

Image

You can see the two bow lines and the port side spring line if you look closely.

Image

And another view, with the aft end of the spring line and the short stern line (no snubber in this pic).

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NiceAft
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Re: Slip storage

Post by NiceAft » Fri Mar 22, 2019 9:25 am

I slipped Nice Aft for quite a few years, and never needed a cleat amidship.

I will run a line from the bow cleat to the dock, but tie it to the dock slightly astern of the bow cleat. I will run a line from the stern cleat to the dock, but tie it to the dock slightly forward of the stern cleat. I was never in a slip where I could use both port and starboard cleats at the same time. Unless i’m Missing something, you should be good using your idea without criss crossing over your deck. Port to port. Starboard to starboard.

It is important to use fenders of sufficient diameter. I currently use 8.5”, but am thinking about 10.5”. The cost is what is deterring me. Over a hundred dollars each.

Ray

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Jimmyt
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Re: Slip storage

Post by Jimmyt » Fri Mar 22, 2019 11:12 am

Is there any water level change at your slip? If your dock is floating, like Tomfoolery, no biggie, but if your dock is fixed and the level changes significantly, you might need to review your tie-up, and fender strategy more carefully.

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RussMT
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Re: Slip storage

Post by RussMT » Fri Mar 22, 2019 2:14 pm

1) Snacks:
Packaged beef jerky
small package chips
cases of bottle water
coffee - Admiral loves her Starbucks packets, just add hot water
We grill EVERYTHING. Magma grill is fantastic. Nothing tastes as good as food grilled on the water.

2)
More info about your slip. Floating? Fixed pilings? Water level changes? Neighbor boats? Dock cleats? Where are dock cleats/pilings?

You seem to have a good handle on it.

If you can:

Affix fenders to the dock, not the boat. Lots of them. Attach dock guard to the dock. This makes it idiot proof (see image below). You don't have to remember to lower/raise/store fenders.

Adjust your dock lines with the loop on boat cleats. When you leave, toss lines on the dock. Return, simply place loop over cleats, lines are always the right length. I'm amazed at how many people don't use the loop on their boat cleats.

Don't oversize your dock lines. You want a little give/stretch which is why you are best crossing stern lines to give more length to stretch. Pull the boat in every possible direction to make sure it has room to move and not hit anything.

I have one spring line from aft cleat to the middle of the dock midships. I have only 4 places I can use dock lines.
Image


If you have a slipmate, you may put out defensive fenders. Or another trick it to run a line the length of your slip as a boundary keeping slipmate from accidentally entering your slip and your boat.

Image

Dockside AC power/water. Use marine grade power cords and drinking quality hoses.

Enjoy the ability to use your boat quickly and easily.

--Russ

Starscream
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Re: Slip storage

Post by Starscream » Fri Mar 22, 2019 3:27 pm

Tomfoolery wrote:
Curwen wrote:2) Any tips on how to tie off in the slip? I don't have a cleat midships so spring lines are off the list unless I add a midships cleat.
My slip has a midship cleat, so I run a spring line from the bow cleat to that to serve as a spring. The stern line is something like 45 degrees off vertical, and is the only thing keeping the boat from being blown forward into the dock (bow-first docking), so I use the forward spring to take load off the stern line. It only has to keep the stern from moving away from the dock. I use a rubber snubber on it, too, since it's so short (not much stretch to it).

Bow lines flare out in a big vee to hold the bow against sideways motion, and to keep the boat from moving backward out of the slip. But if a big blow is coming, I can add a stern spring line to that same mid-dock cleat.

The spring(s) do most of the work, since the wind is almost always from the stern (out of the north) and sometimes the bow.

Oh, and this is a floating dock, by the way. Not clear on what you have to work with, though.



You can see the two bow lines and the port side spring line if you look closely.


And another view, with the aft end of the spring line and the short stern line (no snubber in this pic).
X2

That's exactly how we do it: we have two cleats on the dock and two on the boat. It's held through the worst summer storms, and through the occasional east wind where 5 miles of fetch into our marina can really throw the boat around.

Also X2 on the dock fenders:
https://www.costco.ca/AMP-Marine-Dock-B ... 48758.html
These are a must for the dock because sometimes the boat fenders can end up on top of the dock after a good set of waves on the beam, and become useless.

Also X2 on the defensive fenders on the outside side of the boat. Neighbors suck, and sometimes when the neighbor's slip is empty a transient will pop in there and you'll never know where the scratches came from.

Must haves:
--Roll of garbage bags...we use these: https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07124 ... UTF8&psc=1 and tuck them into that otherwise useless hard-plastic pocket in the front of the galley.
--Hard-mount bottle opener: https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07648 ... UTF8&psc=1. One is on the boat, one is screwed into the beer fridge in the garage.
--Paper towels and holder. We mounted this one: https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B003O3 ... UTF8&psc=1 on a strip of stick-on Velcro that the PO had on the roof liner over the sink.
--Anti-spider broom, kept on the cabin-top within easy reach without having to get on the boat to arm yourself. In our neck of the woods you have to do battle with the river spiders before you even think of boarding.
--A must have for the gun enthusiast: https://www.amazon.ca/BUG-A-SALT-2-0-Ne ... -1-catcorr. Turns buggy nights into a hunt, and safe for the kids!

Those are the things that get used every time...I'm sure there are more.



I

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Curwen
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Re: Slip storage

Post by Curwen » Fri Mar 22, 2019 3:29 pm

Responses to previous comments:

1) floating docks for a lake, there will be a 2 foot or so drop over the summer, but floating docks.

2) Single berth slip, so no berth mate to worry about.

3) I will be picking up pretty much every dock fender for sale on Craigslist this summer. I have a few already. I like the idea of having them mounted to the dock.

4) No shore power available and I don't have hook-ups anyway.

5) Looking at the Magma grill. We have a freeze dryer so we can grill at home and then rehydrate at will with warm water. We also have a GoSunPro solar oven that is portable and super useful. Still, we are looking at the grill, my brother has one his boat and it is great.

6) I am so buying the Bug-a-salt.

There will be rain gear and a couple of Fortress Clothing Hoodies onboard for those sudden, unexpected temperature drops.

Now...waiting for my order from BWY....

Thank you all for the help and tips.

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RussMT
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!

Post by RussMT » Fri Mar 22, 2019 5:21 pm

1) floating docks for a lake, there will be a 2 foot or so drop over the summer, but floating docks.
Same here. Best kind of slip. Boat and dock always the same level. Removes the need to account for tide/drop.
Based on your original post, you got this dock line stuff already figured out.
2) Single berth slip, so no berth mate to worry about.
Sweet! You have the ideal situation.
3) I will be picking up pretty much every dock fender for sale on Craigslist this summer. I have a few already. I like the idea of having them mounted to the dock.
I mounted them all along the dock so if the boat hits (and it will) no real damage. There are many styles. Find what works best for your dock.
Along with dock guards, I also mounted 3 fenders horizontally along the dock. When the boat hits (and it does) it's a soft impact. This is easier than dangling fenders off the boat.
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=dock+guards
4) No shore power available and I don't have hook-ups anyway.
Same here. I've learned to conserve power and use solar. LEDs are great.
5) Looking at the Magma grill. We have a freeze dryer so we can grill at home and then rehydrate at will with warm water. We also have a GoSunPro solar oven that is portable and super useful. Still, we are looking at the grill, my brother has one his boat and it is great.
As much as I'm impressed with your freeze drying skills, one of our best pleasures on the boat is grilling some flesh on the magma grill. We make EVERYTHING from bacon and eggs, pizza to burgers. I can say it was one of the best investments and we use it all the time.
With that said, everyone should use their boats in a way they enjoy and not how another family would.
[6) I am so buying the Bug-a-salt.
I have one at home. Brilliant idea to bring it to the boat.
Now...waiting for my order from BWY....
They are great to deal with. What are you waiting on?

You will really enjoy the ease of hopping on the boat and sailing without launching. Also...it's nice to have a place to come back to when bad weather hits and wait it out in safety.
I love the Mac D. It's a great boat and so much fun to sail.

--Russ

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Curwen
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Re: Slip storage

Post by Curwen » Sat Mar 23, 2019 7:09 am

They are great to deal with. What are you waiting on?
I had slides added to my sail and my bolt rope relaxed. Cheryl has been fantastic to work with. It should be heading home early next week.

I am very excited about the halyards aft kit I ordered. In a few weeks, I will be adding lazy jacks to take extra advantage of the slides. I have a hank-on jib, so I am trying to figure out how to capture and collect the jib when I drop it so I don't have to go forward to work with it.

Also getting a new anchor light, mast base quick pin and a bow pin.

Will be getting a new fuse panel as well. The wiring is awful and I will be redoing it this summer.

My boat was a neglected boat and I will slowly get her setup how I want.

I will get a grill, but the freeze dryer is an amazing thing, Last night we completed a tray of stuffed chicken breasts wrapped in bacon. A little hot water and they taste just like they came out of the oven. That does not address the joy of sitting in a beautiful location and going through the joy of tossing something on the grill. We are sailors, the journey is important. if it was about the destination we would be power-boaters. Since we are Mac owners, we realize that both are important and do each as required or desired. :)
Last edited by Curwen on Sat Mar 23, 2019 7:14 am, edited 1 time in total.

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dlandersson
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Re: Slip storage

Post by dlandersson » Sat Mar 23, 2019 7:10 am

I have a midships cleat and it's very useful, not only for a spring line but for approaching and leaving the dock. It's well worth looking in to. 8)

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RussMT
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Re: Slip storage

Post by RussMT » Sat Mar 23, 2019 11:47 am

dlandersson wrote:I have a midships cleat and it's very useful, not only for a spring line but for approaching and leaving the dock. It's well worth looking in to. 8)
Good point. I wish our Mac came with one. I'm not sure where/how to install one at this point.

Another good suggestion I learned from Ray at BWY (he's awesome) is to run a line from bow cleat to stern cleat. This gives you a "handle" to grab when docking to pull the boat in. I used this the first year and it came in handy with the dock we were using.

--Russ

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RussMT
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Re: Slip storage

Post by RussMT » Sat Mar 23, 2019 12:20 pm

Curwen wrote:
They are great to deal with. What are you waiting on?
I had slides added to my sail and my bolt rope relaxed. Cheryl has been fantastic to work with. It should be heading home early next week.

I am very excited about the halyards aft kit I ordered. In a few weeks, I will be adding lazy jacks to take extra advantage of the slides. I have a hank-on jib, so I am trying to figure out how to capture and collect the jib when I drop it so I don't have to go forward to work with it.
I have a friend with a Mac D who fabricated his own furler system. I forgot what all he used, but it worked fairly well. Some PVC and other parts.
Here is a link I found
viewtopic.php?f=8&t=16494&start=0&hilit ... ct#p193434
https://forums.sailboatowners.com/index ... er.103997/

A trick I'm going to do next is run a halyard LOOP back to the cockpit. Jim K. did this and allowed him to raise and lower the main from the cockpit. Lowering mine isn't always simple as it sometimes needs effort to pull it down. This loop would address that.

Also getting a new anchor light, mast base quick pin and a bow pin.
This forum taught me to use LEDs and their polarity to toggle between steaming light and anchor light using the same 2 stock wires. Works great.
http://www.macgregorsailors.com/modt/index.php?view=453
Will be getting a new fuse panel as well. The wiring is awful and I will be redoing it this summer.
I'm redoing some electrical stuff as well. Tip: Buy a good quality ratcheting crimper. LEDs are now cheap to replace all incandescent bulbs.
My boat was a neglected boat and I will slowly get her setup how I want.
That's part of the fun. Making it your own.
I will get a grill, but the freeze dryer is an amazing thing, Last night we completed a tray of stuffed chicken breasts wrapped in bacon. A little hot water and they taste just like they came out of the oven. That does not address the joy of sitting in a beautiful location and going through the joy of tossing something on the grill. We are sailors, the journey is important. if it was about the destination we would be power-boaters. Since we are Mac owners, we realize that both are important and do each as required or desired. :)
Okay okay, so you got me curious about this freeze drying stuff. Did some googling and it's very interesting. I see why you like it so much. The freeze dryer I found was expensive. But the benefits are amazing. Good taste and nutrition. Easy to rehydrate. I'd love to know more about what foods you bring on the boat from this process.

--Russ

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Curwen
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Re: Slip storage

Post by Curwen » Mon Mar 25, 2019 7:43 am

Russ,

I now have added a new goal to the summer checklist and that is fabricating a homemade rolling furler.

My very favorite freeze dried food is peaches. I'm a snacker and these hit the sweet sugar craving without busting the calorie budget. Other FD favs are steaks, porkchops, mashed potatoes, lasagna, mac and cheese, my homemade chili and Brazilian black beans and rice. Almost everything can be eaten dry, and most thing re-hydrate really well. Last week, the grocery store had pastrami on sale for a great price so we picked up some, and freeze dried that. They are going to be my early season beef jerky replacement. My brother loves to drop FD cherries into his Fireball while he sails on his Cat 27. Now...my spcheal about the FD....yes, they are expensive, about two BOAT bucks, but we believe in being prepared for many things. We decided that it would be better for us to buy the FD and freeze dry our favorite recipes instead of purchasing the commercially available products. The other fun things we've done in the FD...sushi, salt water taffy, milk duds, Skittles (my co-workers have been known to buy bags of Skittles and slip me some cash to do a bag for them), rice, peaches, pears, watermelon (nature's cotton candy when FD), pineapple (my wife's favorite), blueberries, apricots, apples (some with powdered red hots to give a fun kick for the granddaughter), salsa, jello (textures like a crunchy baklava), sausages, and pudding. Breaking out the FD ice cream sandwiches always gets lots of smiles. Almost every week, I have a Facebook post showing the results of one of my favorite games...Will it Freeze Dry?

You can freeze dry almost anything, the only exceptions are things with a lot of grease or oil and things with high sugar content. I know I mentioned lots of candy that does well, but blueberries take forever to complete and seem to absorb moisture from the air very quickly. There are several Facebook groups that focus on the process, but if you have a question, please PM me, I would be glad to answer any questions.

One of the things I love about sailing, it that a lot of the gear for being comfortable on the boat also works while camping and in some case even hiking.

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Curwen
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Re: Slip storage

Post by Curwen » Mon Mar 25, 2019 8:15 am

Russ,
Good point. I wish our Mac came with one. I'm not sure where/how to install one at this point.

Another good suggestion I learned from Ray at BWY (he's awesome) is to run a line from bow cleat to stern cleat. This gives you a "handle" to grab when docking to pull the boat in. I used this the first year and it came in handy with the dock we were using.
THAT IS GENIUS!!! I am going to assume you ran the line outside of the rails? Any interference with the jib lines or sail up by the bow?

I have tracks midships, so I can get cleats on tracks if it becomes important to put a cleat midships. I have to have some fiberglass repair done, a baby stay pulled loose last year and I need it repaired. My fixit guy has been doing sailboat repair for years, so I will be asking him about the cost of adding a fixed cleat midships, as I think they are useful when tying off to my brother's boat when we decide to drift about.

Thank you,

Curwen

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NiceAft
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Re: Slip storage

Post by NiceAft » Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:53 am

Several years ago I read in a post on this site about running a line (outside of the life line Stanchons) from the bow to the stern. It does come in handy both when docking and leaving the dock. On extremely windy days, having that line to use as a handle, was what kept Nice Aft from being blown away from the dock, while I was trying to tie up to a cleat. On those days, a strong back and a good grip comes in handy :)

Ray

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