Think about your MOB procedures

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dlandersson
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Think about your MOB procedures

Post by dlandersson » Tue Aug 14, 2018 4:49 pm


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Herschel
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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by Herschel » Tue Aug 14, 2018 6:07 pm

A good topic. About a year ago my wife and I were sailing in a large lake in Florida late in the afternoon on a fall day. We came across a sailboat largely out of control in which a single crew person was trying to get our attention and pointed astern to her captain who had fallen overboard. Turns out he was in the cool water for about 30 minutes without a PFD. He was weak but conscious. We used a four step swim ladder hung over the gunwhale in the cockpit to get him aboard. He exclaimed that he thought he was going to die and we had saved his life. We got him back aboard his boat, and they sailed back to the dock. I really recommend having one of these swim ladders onboard and easily available in an emergency. By having this type of boarding ladder, I was able to steer right up to him upwind with the engine in idle and did not have to turn off the engine to get him up the standard stern swim ladder. My sense was that turning off the engine would have made control over the situation less assured.
https://www.overtons.com/product/detail ... p&i=321212

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Gazmn
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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by Gazmn » Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:53 am

Herschel wrote:A good topic. About a year ago my wife and I were sailing in a large lake in Florida... We used a four step swim ladder hung over the gunwhale in the cockpit to get him aboard. He exclaimed that he thought he was going to die and we had saved his life. ...By having this type of boarding ladder, I was able to steer right up to him upwind with the engine in idle and did not have to turn off the engine to get him up the standard stern swim ladder. My sense was that turning off the engine would have made control over the situation less assured.
https://www.overtons.com/product/detail ... p&i=321212
Hey Guys,
While I remembered your post regarding this & commended both of you for your unselfish action & heroics - I forgot the finer details that make " having a side ladder & motor in standby" such a clutch piece of safety & personal enjoyment equipment. It's also great for dingy, kayak & paddle board transfers. So the step ladder satisfies our 2 for 1 feature. Good job, Again Cap'n :wink:

& Yes, I got mine :)

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Gazmn
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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by Gazmn » Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:02 am

dlandersson wrote:Think about your MOB procedures 8)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... -boat.html

I don't use jacklines - yet. Am a fair weather boater; but will wear my vest w/ hand held radio & knife more. I think this just has to be our mindset. I'm in my 50's & "feeling it". I have to keep in mind - -We are all as good as our last mistake... :|

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sailboatmike
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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by sailboatmike » Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:02 pm

I really don't understand the mindset of people not wearing life jackets or personal Floatation Devices ( PFD) as they like to call them these days (must be politically correct).

We are mainly fair weather sailors however a inflatable PFD goes on before we leave the dock no matter what the weather is like, I guess its a bit like a seatbelt, here in Australia seatbelts have been compulsory for many many years so even sitting in a car without a seatbelt on feels VERY strange indeed.

Its nothing to do with BIG BROTHER watching you or a INFRINGEMENT of your HUMAN RIGHTS, its to do with long proven safety, no matter how good a swimmer you may think you are.

I see all the time fisherman heading out without PFD's on and just shake my head, maybe these people need to put themselves in the shoes of others, I don't think its very pleasant for the coastguard to have to pull bodies out of the water that have been stewing for many days, what about their families, how are they going to survive???

Not wearing a PFD is just MACHO BS in my book

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NiceAft
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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by NiceAft » Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:47 pm

I did not read anything about a PFD in the article. I did read that he was “dragged” in the water. That leads me to believe he had a tether (also not mentioned). He just might have done everything he was supposed to. If you are in the water while tethered, unconscious, and being dragged, G-d help you.

Ray

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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by whgoffrn » Wed Aug 15, 2018 5:15 pm

I thought the same thing.... about being tethered but then again I often have sheet lines all over the place when I'm scrambling in a squall ..... it definately gives a person something to think about and analyze how easily something like that can happen ..... I've considered switching to all inflatable pfds because I often find I'm not wearing mine .... and I dont want the auto inflate pfd because of the story of the kids who died in the mac that turned turtle .... if u were in a knock down and got unlucky enough to get a rope wrapped around an ankle or your pfd and drug behind the boat .... I'm not sure there is an easy way out of that

If I was ever in a true knock down it would be bad news for me ...I carry my generator , air conditioner, 35lb anchor with chain ...a rope goes from the bow and tied off back to the cockpit on either side of the boat so I can deploy the anchor or sea anchor from either side of cockpit if in trouble but of course that leaves ropes and lines and heavy stuff everywhere in the cockpit. If we were on our boat on the trailer in our driveway and it fell off the trailer wed prob all die from the flying anchors batteries grill genetator etc etc

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Herschel
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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by Herschel » Wed Aug 15, 2018 6:54 pm

It's also great for dingy, kayak & paddle board transfers. So the step ladder satisfies our 2 for 1 feature.
A good point. I have wrestled with my inflatable dinghy a couple of times climbing back onboard from swim call. :P Not easy to do.

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Gazmn
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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by Gazmn » Thu Aug 16, 2018 3:38 am

If we were on our boat on the trailer in our driveway and it fell off the trailer wed prob all die from the flying anchors batteries grill genetator etc etc
While At sea, is the spark of this conversation, thanks Dl; However, if u fall off your boat while on land - you’re screwed :|
While I have circumvented my offing many times while modding in my driveway - don’t kid yourself or the risks... you Certainly Won’t be The same after a landside fall :| :!:

Sailboat Mike, again, made some legitimate points about macho BS & General stupidity & Not wearing a pfd, inflatable or not, while at sea... I like regular strapon vests for the most part - nothing to think about - other than putting them on :evil: & that’s gonna be my Angry Bird Mantra, from now on :)


Thanks Mike :) & All...

Alexis
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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by Alexis » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:29 am

sailboatmike wrote:I really don't understand the mindset of people not wearing life jackets or personal Floatation Devices ( PFD) as they like to call them these days (must be politically correct).
Just a comment about the difference between these two types of gear, as we recently went shopping and had this question initially:
- the Life Jacket is a "heavy duty" PFD. It is the gear that you put on when there is a high probability you will fall in the water. It is not design for comfort, but is about survivalism.
- a Personal Flotation Device is the common flotation gear that is designed for a specific sport (boating, kayaking...) and is supposed to be worn all the time.
A Canadian approved (coast guard, Transport Canada, etc.) standard lifejacket, when worn properly, is designed to turn an unconscious person from face down to face up in the water, allowing them to breathe. The standard lifejacket is keyhole style and comes in two sizes - one for people who weigh over 40 kg (90 lbs), and one for those who weigh less than 40 kg (90 lbs).
My wife and I were initially searching for real lifejackets, but the only ones we could find were the inflatable types, and we were not convinced by the reliability of the automatic inflation system. We happen to have two real lifejackets which came with our boat, they are large rectangular things placed behind the neck and on the chest. They are not comfortable at all and reduce a lot your movement agility.

We finally decided to purchase PFDs designed for kayaking, as these are comfortable, they are worn high on the body and don't limit moments.

By the way: we tested our new PFDs in the water around our anchored boat. I strongly recommended you guys do that (if it can be done safely of course!) When you are in the water bellow your boat, you may be stunned by how much your movements are limited by damped clothes, and by the high free board of Macgregors which absolutely prevents from climbing back in the boat if you don't have a ladder. And would you be able to climb back from the transom without having a ladder anyway?

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NiceAft
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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by NiceAft » Thu Aug 16, 2018 11:33 am

When we purchase Nice Aft back in 2004, the only life jackets we had were those we used on our 14’ Phantom sailboat (think improved Sunfish). Those life saving devices were too bulky for the Mac. We purchased six (that’s the capacity of people recommended for the boat) auto inflating life vests. They are flat to the chest, which makes them comfortable. They are designed to right an unconscious person the water, and they have a pull cord to inflate when needed. It has been thirteen years now, and I replace the bobbin when recommended . Not inexpensive but well worth t.

I have tested one, twice. Once to see how long it takes to inflate when you fall in. I purposefully acted unconscious, so as to see what happens. Inflation is not instantaneous by any means. It does right an unconscious person in the water.

The second time was a few years back when I made a blunder while sailing the Phantom. We ended in the water, and while treading water, laughing all the way, suddenly, there were two big yellow chests in the lake. They are that comfortable, that we forgot we were wearing them. The rearming kits ar not inexpensive either. My life is worth more. I’m glad the vests were there.

I heartily endorse either manual inflation life vests, or auto inflating (with a manual pull cord).

Whether you are for, or against these type of vests, is not important. Wearing some type of type III or V life vest is.

Ray

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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by Highlander » Mon Sep 17, 2018 12:57 pm

I,m wondering if he tripped on a sheet line or mainsheet or other line that got accidentally wrapped around his angle , because Im, thinkin if he was tethered in they r usually only 3-6ft long so why would the other 2 crew members not trying to get him aboard or at least keep his head above water ? but one can always jester why, really need to b there to understand the circumstances , if he was tangled up in a line being dragged 15-20ft behind the boat I can see why the othe boat crew member would b jumpin in first if they were right behind the other boat , b interesting to find out just why he was unconscious accidental jybe or tripped & hit his head on the deck or hull on the way down & O/B , with gusts to 23mp/h she would b rough in a 24ft boat , he was 60 I wonder how old the other two crew members were , I can just imagine how hard it would b for two young strong men too pull someone from the water into a boat in these conditions , gotta give the crew member from the other boat that jumped in a lot of credit for trying too save the poor guy,s life , one good reason why to b tethered in in these conditions with a short 3ft tether if poss & hope u don,t go over the side

J

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Jonair222
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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by Jonair222 » Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:29 am

I only wear my seatbelt when I am on an interstate, during a late night in a dangerous area, or doing something risky. I have been in a few minor accidents and in these events a seatbelt has not really benefited me (although I know of people who have been severely injured by partial strangulation from belts or hit by air bags.
My truck has the seatbelt warning disabled and an airbag override. No Government should control my choices in self protection.

Boats should be much the same. Put that jacket on if things get Nasty. Don't go far from shore if you aren't capable of swimming back to your boat or land, or if conditions are cold/rough. Clip in on long hauls. Don't go alone unless fairest weather abounds. I could not imagine having to wear a jacket 24/7 on such a small boat as a a MAC. The boom would probably grab me by the straps and throw me over.

The boom is the most dangerous component on a small boat. Make sure all guest are aware of it. Have a permanent boarding platform aft. Have a kill switch like on a PWC for motoring, and be weary of tiller locks and autopilots. Carry a waterproof mobile phone or VHF.

This is my Man Overboard Plan.

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NiceAft
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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by NiceAft » Sun Feb 03, 2019 2:32 pm

Jonair222,

With all due respect, I find your choice of actions to be going against what is accepted as good boating practice.

Reaching for a jacket "when things get nasty" implies you will not be hit by the unexpected; that you will always know when the right time is to start thinking of safety.

"Don't go far from shore if you aren"t capable of swimming back to your boat or land, or if conditions are cold/rough." implies you won't be knocked unconscious from hitting your head, or being incapacitated and not being able to swim. I could go on.

The inflatable jackets made today are light, flat, and comfortable to wear for hours. I find it hard to fathom why a boater would be so nonchalant about safety. Is it possible that you actually believe you know better than the U.S. Coast Guard, B.O.A.T.U.S., and many organizations dedicated to boating safety, and the precautions that should be taken.

Maybe you were just being facetious, and are trying to see what kind of response you will get? if so, it worked on me. I've been had, and you're really not cavalier about safety. :) OK, you got me.

Ray

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dlandersson
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Re: Think about your MOB procedures

Post by dlandersson » Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:10 pm

Jonair222. WADR, you remind of of a fellow long distance runner in high school. He smoked, because he thought it was ok. Now his wife and kids are orphans.

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