West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

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Indulgence
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West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by Indulgence » Thu Sep 17, 2009 10:21 pm

At this writing I am sitting in our newly aquired Sidney B.C. (Vancouver Island, Saanich Peninsula) condominium. Been here a week setting up a secondary office, calling tradesmen, getting quotes and renovating (cheap for a reason). No trip to the BVI's this year, this little place is going to suck the bilges dry!

Ultimately the goal is to come here a week a month, have a roof over my head with an office to work in, and walk across the parking lot to the marina and take off for the afternoon on Indulgence. Weekends I want to be able to cruise anywhere from Friday Harbour to Nanaimo without too much drama. I expect eventually, once some mortgages are more in hand, I will be stricken with tenfootitis and find I can't live without a 36' keelboat c/w finicky diesel and baggy sails. But until that day comes I don't intend to venture into the Strait of Georgia or head around the west side of Van' Ilse in our Mac 26X. Well maybe the Strait if the wx is really perfect.

I've fitted her out fairly well in terms of livability. This winter I intend to upgrade her to some sort of coastal standard. She's got a Chartplotter with depth sounder. There's an autopilot the works with the GPS but I've disconnected it. She's got new sails and a great CQR anchor as well as a secondary Danforth. The only two things that come immediately to mind are to take off the centerboard and fill it with lead (per Eric Hartle). There's already a 2:1 block rigged to raise the centerboard with a steel cable so I'm not too worried about the added weight. I've upgraded those slider things to decent sized turnbuckles. I intend to replace the standing rigging with brand new heavier gauge cable. One of the spreaders is a little creased. I was thinking of replacing both of them with stainless tubing.

Some of you guys pound about in windy, wavey, salty water all the time and I'd really like your input.
What works, what doesn't. What should I be looking at?
Do I care about zinc anodes if we always raise the motor when she's slipped?
Mold control. Cabin heat (I have a Mr Heater for Alberta spring and fall use).
What about bottom paint- if I take it out every few months and clean the bottom is it necessary?

I see that video of Mike Inmom sailing through 15' waves and think to myself I'd likely die right there.
Any big wave advice, should I get caught out? How much "sea" can my 26X take?

I have a lot more questions, but maybe if a discussion is started some of them will be answered.
So I'll leave it at that for now,
Salutations from the luckiest guy in the world,
Laurie

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Chinook
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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by Chinook » Fri Sep 18, 2009 4:40 am

It sounds to me like you're starting out with two of the most important items, a healthy degree of respect for your intended cruising waters and serious attention to preparing your boat. That said, you haven't mentioned a dinghy, which, given the tidal range around Puget Sound and the Straits, is essential if you're going to go beyond simply visiting marinas. Lots of info on this board regarding how to approach the dinghy problem. I presume your electronics also include electronic charts for area waters, a depth sounder and VHF radio. I'd also recommend picking up a recent issue of Waggoners cruising guide, maybe also Gunkholing in the San Juans, and a good chart book. There are some excellent ones available. I'm away from home, but I think mine is put out by Maptech. A pricey item but really nice when the rains move in is a full cockpit surround. I'd be sure and have a spare prop along. I also carry replacement spark plugs, extra lines, spare sail stop, and miscellaneous other spare parts items. I think a radar reflector is a good idea in those waters, since fog can often become a factor. Regarding bottom paint, I don't, but I don't keep my boat in a slip. I did take her to Alaska, which kept her in cold NW waters for 2 1/2 months, and I had a really good biology experiment to deal with when I got back. If I was going to regularly keep my boat slipped in salt water 2 months or more each season, I'd probably go with bottom paint. You're sitting in the midst of some of the finest cruising waters in North America. The best answer to your well prepared boat's ability to handle conditions is taking her out and experiencing them. New waters and conditions will soon become familiar. Good luck exploring new waters.

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Phil M
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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by Phil M » Fri Sep 18, 2009 9:26 am

After sailing the Gulf Islands for two weeks, I came back and bought a dodger. I don't always use it now, but I carry it aboard, and it will be there when I need it. 8) I really don't like salty spray in your face.

Phil M

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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by c130king » Fri Sep 18, 2009 9:35 am

Indulgence wrote: I intend to replace the standing rigging with brand new heavier gauge cable.
A question to any rigging experts...are the cables the weak link or is the attachment to the boat the weak link? In other words would replacing the rigging with heavier guage do anything if the chainplates are more likely to fail than the standard cables?

Just wondering.

Thanks,
Jim

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Terry
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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by Terry » Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:17 am

Laurie:
It is vey unlikely you will get by without bottom paint. Take it from me, I held out for six seasons before bottom painting last spring. Bottom painting was the best thing I did. Cleaning the dirty hull every 4-6 weeks is a big ugly dirty job, I did it way too many times but I was a slow learner. You really don't want to be doing it, really, believe me! It is not worth it. Do the epoxy barrier coat then the bottom coat and be done with, you don't have time travelling back and forth to haul out and clean the bottom and you will likely have to do it every trip out here.
Now that said, congratulations on being able to get a secondary residence in Sydney. I have stopped in at the Sydney marina a few times and it is very nice, but I have to cross the Georgia Strait and Active Pass to get there. Do not be intimidated by the Georgia Strait, I day sail it almost every weekend out of Point Roberts. We (my wife & I) sail almost all the way over to Mayne Island and back all the time. Each summer we do trips in the San Juans and Southern Gulf Islands and these trips always include crossing the big strait, it is no big deal, we can get from PR to Active Pass in two hours at 3500 rpm and down to Sucia in two hours at the same rpm. It is a long haul over open water but we always seem to make out OK. The only real scary time we had was coming back down south from Bowen Island in a small craft warning, we got trounced around pretty good out off Sandheads, but we lived to tell about it.
The view comming into Vancouver Harbour (English Bay) from the strait is nothing short of spectacular if you have never done it before, I have only done it a few times and even though I live here it is rare that I get to see the city from such a beautiful perspective.
I realize many boaters moor in Sydney just to avoid the big bad Georgia Strait but it is not as bad as some make it out to be, most of the time it is pretty tame, it is only when the wind really kicks up that it gets rough out there and even then the Mac can handle it in its' stride.
I am not sure you need to beef up your rigging for the Georgia Strait, The X boats out here seem to fare quite well with stock configuration although a wide dodger (Dowsar) would be a nice asset. I upgraded my forestay to a 5/32 same as shrouds and also the turnbuckle to 5/16 when I got my Schaefer Snapfurler but that was to accomodate the furler.
Enjoy yourself in one of the worlds premiere sailing destinations!

c130king wrote:
Indulgence wrote: I intend to replace the standing rigging with brand new heavier gauge cable.
A question to any rigging experts...are the cables the weak link or is the attachment to the boat the weak link? In other words would replacing the rigging with heavier guage do anything if the chainplates are more likely to fail than the standard cables?

Just wondering.

Thanks,
Jim
I am no expert by any means but from just simple observation my guess is that the cables are weaker than any of the chainplates could be. I also question the use of a 1/8 (4/32) forestay resisting the strains of four 5/32 shrouds and a backstay. When I upgraded my forestay the change instilled a higher level of confidence I had for my rigging. That beefier forestay & turnbuckle really looks stronger and it really is needed for the heavy rollerfurler. There is also a stronger mast available from the factory for the X if one is so inclined.

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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by Kelly Hanson East » Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:55 am

Salt water brings the possibility of swage corrosion which is difficult to detect. You need to carefully inspect the swages, especially on the forestay, since if these go, you demast....CRASH!!!

Be careful upgrading your rigging in size, remember you have to tension rigging to 10% of (breaking load) to stop shock loading, and with even a nominal size increase you can then require tension which will exceed the design loads of the rest of the rigging (chainplates, hounds, etc.)

Loosely tensioned (and thus shockloaded) heavier rigging will fail before correctly tensioned smaller rigging.

On edit - corrected error on tension - should be 10% of breaking load, not Safe Working Load (SWL)
Last edited by Kelly Hanson East on Thu Oct 01, 2009 2:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Duane Dunn, Allegro
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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by Duane Dunn, Allegro » Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:52 am

You have a good start on the right equipment. After 9 years in the Northwest with our X I can say without a doubt the boat can take you anywhere these beautiful protected waters have to offer. All the Straits in the area, Georgia, Juan De Fu ca, Haro, and Rosario deserve respect, but not fear. Make smart decisions regarding the weather and you can cross any of them with your Mac.

Personally I don't feel there is a need to upgrade the rigging. It is sized correctly for the loads and the supporting structure of the boat. I simply keep my jib halyard attached to the bow pulpit ahead of the furler as a backup to the forestay for peace of mind and have never had a problem.

You'll want to always have accurate tide and current information on board. I highly recommend the Capt Jack tide/current books and the Canadian Current atlas
http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/st ... sNum=12900 .
It is a book you can use over and over, you just buy the current tables each year that tell you what page to refer to for each hour of each day. With it you can get an instant picture of what you are up against and can make smart decisions that will save you time and money in fuel as well as make the ride more comfortable. It will also help you plan trips so you hit the numerous current passes in the area at slack.

I also couldn't imagine cruising around here with the Waggoneer cruising guide, it is essential gear. You don't need to buy it every year, every 3-4 will do.
http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/st ... sNum=13149

If you keep the boat in the water for more than a few weeks at a time you will certainly want bottom paint, you can't get away without it. Not only will the cleaning be a pain, but if you are unlucky and get a set of barnacles (which can happen in just a few weeks) you will really regret not having bottom paint.

I feel a full enclosure; dodger, bimini, connector, and side curtains is essential gear in the Northwest. You want to be able to step into a dry and comfortable boat any time of the year and enjoy the trip. Standing at the helm in rain and spray not only is no fun, but is not necessary with an enclosure. It will be the best money you spend on the boat.

A dinghy is necessary to visit many of the best places up here. Getting away from the marinas is where the good stuff is.

I assume you have adequate fuel, 24 gallons is really required, you'll want 10 - 20 gallons of water storage, and certainly the larger of the porta potties with the 5-6 gallon tanks.

You'll want at least two good sized batteries preferably wired separately with a combiner for charging. You'll also want at least a 10 amp charger and shore power with some 110v outlets in the cabin.

A low wattage heater should be left inside running when you leave the boat. This and dampits will keep it moisture and mildew free through the winter. This one works great
http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/st ... enURL=true
It's also good to lift the cushions and covers for good air circulation while you are away.

When we're on board and have shore power we have been very happy with this heater for keeping the crew comfortable
http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/st ... assNum=543

I assume you have the required safety gear, PFDs, Signaling devices, fire ext, etc., as well as the standard navigation and boat gear like at least 4 good sized fenders, 3 good dock lines, boat hook, good binoculars, at least a handheld VHF radio. Sounds like you are set in the ground tackle area. Many who keep their boats in slips have a set of dock lines sized and adjusted correctly at the slip that they leave there when the go out and a second set for transient use while they are out.

The list of other nice to have stuff is endless, but I'd suggest you give it some time and just take notes of what works and what you are missing as you use the boat for a while.

Here are the resources I publish that you may find helpful for ideas.
http://home.comcast.net/~duane.dunn/Mods.htm
http://home.comcast.net/~duane.dunn/storage.htm

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Wind Chime
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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by Wind Chime » Fri Sep 18, 2009 12:50 pm

Welcome to the Pacific Northwest!

The Salish Sea (all waters from Seattle to the North-End of Vancouver Island, and west to the entrance to the Juan De Fu ca Straight) are a very sheltered area and not subject to blue-water swells, etc. It is an amazing cruising ground, but not without its dangers. Safe Sailing here takes good seamanship, which I define as a combination of; Knowledge, Practical Experience, and Situational Awareness.

I believe the biggest issues in this area are:
1. Weather
2. Current
3. Hazards to Navigation


1. Weather:
The wind can pick up very fast in the Georgia and Juan De fu@ Straights. You can have strong wind or gale warnings on a clear blue-sky day ahead of an offshore front. A barometer on board is very handy. And VHF channel 2, 3, or 4 will always give you the latest weather and sea-state conditions.
Fog can be problem. The summer advection fog can reduce visibility to 20 feet and last for days. This normally happens when the warm wet air from Hawaii get pushed north and comes in from the Sow-west. Also known as the Hawaiian express.

2. Current:
Spend the time to read a learn the tide book and current atlas, as we have a large tidal flow (10-14ft exchange) that can make for fast currents sometimes to 8 knots in constrained areas, especially in and out and through the Gulf and San Juan Islands. During max current (which is roughly between the high and low tides, although not a linear equation) you can have overfalls to 4 feet and whirlpools with 2-3 foot wide funnels. You will not see more that about 2-4 knots in the open straight, but on a two hour crossing it is easy to miss your landfall if not accounted for. Think of it as crossing a 10 nautical mile wide river with whales in it. We are in a "mixed semi bi-diurnal" tidal area, so the changes are inconsistent.

3. Hazards to Navigation:
The San Juan Archipelago alone has something like 1150 islands at low tide, and only 500 or so a high tide. So there is lots of trouble below. Buy all the charts and get to know the major islands as it helps when on the water. We can see Turtle Back mountain (west side of Orcas Island) from near our home in Vancouver, and you can see it from Victoria as well. So it is always a good landmark for us. There are lots of designated commercial shipping lanes around as well that you need to be aware of.

Passage Planning:
Although it's nice to just jump in the boat and got where the wind takes you, I rarely do. A day sail is one thing, but when going for the weekend or longer I always follow a proper Passage Plan that includes; advanced large and small scale chart work with expected routes to take; advance tide and current calculations; fuel calculations; weather forecasts and isobar printouts; nearest ports on route for fuel and mechanical repairs; foul weather ports; medical aid, etc.
My wife and/or crew always know that I am aware of where we are and what's around the next corner. There will always be surprises and may be unexpected problems, but they enjoy the trip a lot more knowing their skipper has a game plan with contingencies if things or conditions change.

Sail with Others:
Join the "MacGregor Yacht Club of B.C." and learn the local area with new friends. http://www.mycbc.ca . Also, membership entitles you to lots of local information, such as a 12 page "Straight Tips" article on crossing the Georgia Straight, that I wrote for an info-session we did at last years MacRendezvous on Bowen Island.

Have Fun, Be Safe ... and "Leave Only Wake"

Darry

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Indulgence
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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by Indulgence » Sun Sep 27, 2009 5:58 pm

I'm back
OK, the consensus is definitely in favour of bottom paint! I can do that in the shop this winter.
Will have to build some blocking to lift the boat off the trailer,etc, but seems within my grasp.
Will read up on bottom painting and go at it.

Chinook: "how to approach the dinghy problem" ...
Duane Dunne: "A dinghy is necessary to visit many of the best places" ...
I don't understand. I have a boat that floats in a foot of water. Why can't I lift the boards,
throw out my anchor and back up to the shore? I know I'll have to be on top of the tidal situation.
I saw myself going ashore with the Mac tied off (to a tree?) very loosely. I envisioned pulling her
in on my return, casting off the shore line and snugging up the rode. Or even re-anchoring in deeper
water for an overnighter. I do this literally every weekend lake sailing. Why do I want/need
to drag around a dinghy?

Phil, Duane, Wind Chime: Buy a dodger. Got it. Will start looking this winter.

Terry: thanks for your insight about the "big bad Strait" and your other comments. Makes me
feel good about my choices! Hope to run into you some day.

KHE: "tension rigging to 10% of SWL to stop shock loading" I understand your point. The rigging will be 12
years old next spring so I plan on replacing it either way. I'm going to talk to some rigging people I was
referred to in Sidney. Just so I don't look like an idiot when I do- what the hull is 'SWL', Silly Wanker Load?

Duane: I feel quite comfortable when I read your list; I have all your recommended gear except the dodger.
Thanks for taking the time for such a comrehensive response- with links!

Wind Chime: I just challenged my Bareboat Skipper Standard during a charter out of Sidney a month ago.
You sound just like my Examiner! Once that was done we cruised around for another four days to get a taste for the area.
Went to MYCBC. Looks like a great resource. Thanks for the tip on the guys who make dodgers.

1. Bottom Paint
2. Dodger
3. Replace rigging
4. Weight Keel
5. Go sailing

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Indulgence
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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by Indulgence » Sun Sep 27, 2009 6:34 pm

Meant to ask-

I saw diesel everywhere at the fuel docks. Is gasoline as readily available?
On further reflection I realize I carry two six gallon permanent fuel tanks,
not the 24 gallons D.D. feels are necessary. I should know this, but what
is the range on a 50hp 2 stroke? (before you all ask- ballast tanks always full,
running 2500 rpm, speed approx 4-5 knots, assume no current or wind factors,
no assist from the sails)

What do you do about cabin heat when there's no shore power? Like I
said, I have a Mr Heater but that's not the long term solution. Mornings on our chartered
Beneteau in BC in August were chilly enough we appreciated the furnace. (I can't afford
one of those diesel cookstove/heater thingys)

Thanks,
Laurie

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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by LisaBham » Sun Sep 27, 2009 8:40 pm

Yes, you can beach for short periods of time at some locations, but keep in mind that the farther North you go the larger the tidal fluctuation. The difference between low and high tide can be more than 20 feet (vertically) in the Pacific North West and tides change twice per day. Also keep in mind that many of the beaches around here are quite rocky and barnacle covered with large boulders scattered near shore (that might be exposed at low tide). Another consideration are the waves that hit the beach caused by wind, and boat wakes (including frequent ferry traffic) that would make it ill-advised to leave your boat beached unattended for long.

As to the availability of gasoline? Yes, it is available at all the fuel docks I have been at.

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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by Kelly Hanson East » Mon Sep 28, 2009 5:00 am

Ill swag your 50 HP at about 4 smpg under those conditions. That would give you a round trip cruising range of about 16 smiles ((using the rule of 1/3 out, 1/3 return, and 1/3 reserve)

If you know you can get fuel at destination, double that to 33 smiles.

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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by bubba » Thu Oct 01, 2009 11:15 am

As for heat our M came with a Walrus forced air heater installed and it is very efficent on the batteries. We use a down comforter to sleep under and we use a Hudson Bay heavy wool blanket for the summer. I also agree the full enclosure is the way to go, it is spendy but worth the cost on foggy rainy mornings. We added a 3rd reef for the ocassional strong breezes and it works great in the Sound especially with long fetches and wind waves for a more stable boat. We sail the San Juan Islands and in the summer the light breezes offer a chance to use our a-spinnaker with sock quite a lot. We had to get used to getting hung up on the Bull Kelp that almost stops your boat but with raisin the dagger board and rudders the Mac's slide past with ease. Bottom paint is almost a must with hull grouth and zibra clams. OH you might want to get 3 flags to fly : Maple Leaf , Stars and Stripes and a yellow Quarteen flag for going across the boarder , your not on a lake anymore.

Have fun and maybe we will see you at a Mac rendezvous at Sucia island with the BC and Washington state Macgregor Yacht club that is online.

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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by bubba » Thu Oct 01, 2009 11:31 am

About backing up to shore DO NOT leave for more than 15 minites or you will be stuck for hours on muddy, rocky, steepe shores. When you get a dingy get something light enouf you can drag up to the high tide line if you plan to go for a hike. the tides change Quickly, expect 12 to 15 foot tide changes. Last July on Lummi island in the San Juan islands we hooked to a buddies bouy overnight and we had a neigative 4 feet tide in the morning and glad we had our rudders up we were setting in 12 inches of water mostly bull kelp and sea grass and had to PADDLE (YES PADDLE ) to deeper water to start our motor. Get longer and heavier chain for at least 2 anchors and 100 to 200 feet of rode to be safe.

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Duane Dunn, Allegro
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Re: West coast\ Salt water upgrades?

Post by Duane Dunn, Allegro » Thu Oct 01, 2009 1:19 pm

I have more than enough fingers on one hand to count the number of beaches we have visited over the last 16 years where I would even consider beaching our boat. They don't exist up here. We just don't have nice even sand beaches in the Northwest. As a diver of many years I can tell you every square inch down there has something growing on it and none of it is good for the bottom of your boat. As hard as it is to believe, if you were beached, within 15 minutes you will either be high and dry for the next 6-12 hours, or the boat will be back floating away. In addition, thinking the boat will stay nicely lined up bow to a beach when loosely tied is dreaming. Between the wind, current, waves, and wakes a boat left on the beach will be sideways in no time. Remember, while the boat may float in 1' of water you really need 3' of water to use the motor or to have any steering with the rudders.

While using a stern tie as you suggest is very possible and a nice way to tuck inside all the anchored boats, you will find in general you encounter two situations. The first will be that you are stern tied 10'-20' off a rocky shore and even that close the boat is still in 30' to 50' of water. There are many places in the San Juans where 10' off shore the water is over 100' deep. The second situation is you are as shallow as possible, say 2'-3' of water and the beach is still 100 yards away. There are also many long sloping mud bays in the islands.

A great example of this was anchoring in Princess Louisa inlet in front of Chatterbox Falls. I was on the bow and Dawn was at the helm as we pulled in to the beach. She was reading off the depths (our transducer is on the transom) and when we reached 6' I had her reverse to pull back from the beach. It looked quite shallow at the bow and I waited until I saw about 10' of water and then put the anchor down. We backed out until I was at 120' of rode and then I cleated off the line. Dawn backed gently on the anchor to set it in the mud bottom. It didn't get a good bite and in no time we had pulled it off the shelf. The rode went tight as 120' of line, chain, and anchor hung straight down not even touching the bottom. Once I got it hauled back in, we went in for a second try and this time I dropped it in 6' and we set it fine. We were at about 3/4 high tide when we anchored. The next morning at low tide the anchor was 30' up the beach high and dry, but nicely set.

Another thing to consider, particularly in the San Juans, is most of the nice islands are state parks and have many inexpensive mooring buoys conveniently placed for your use. This is becoming even more common as they try to limit the damage done to the bottom by anchors. We're not long from anchoring being banned in some places. All these buoys are out where a 45' deep draft boat can be safe at even the lowest tide. We use them often, they are great for the peace of mind that gives you a good nights sleep, but you won't be going to shore from them without a dinghy.

Unless you are a marina only type of cruiser, or never want to leave your boat, you will find cruising in the northwest is not possible without a dingy.

I've not been in a marina up here yet that had fuel but didn't have gasoline.

Our old 50hp Tohatsu two stroke got around 5 Nautical miles per gallon at 4-6 knots, it got 4 Nmpg at 7-10 knots, and got 3 Nmpg at speeds over 10 knots. You not only have to consider your fuel mileage, but you need to allow for often loosing 1-3 knots of speed over ground when you hit a contrary current. This can make a big dent in you net fuel mileage. Most people end up speeding up the boat to keep the speed they want and using more gas in the process.

In general you can usually find a fuel dock within a 30Nm radius from most anywhere up here. However there are places you will just not be able to get to with only 12 gallons on board. For instance, you want to visit Princess Louisa. It is 35 Nm to the head of the inlet from the nearest fuel in Egmont, 70 Nmiles round trip. We used 3-1/2 tanks (6 gallon) for that part of the trip while cruising at 6-7 knots. You'll sail you say. That's a great thought, but the reality is you have to get to the 30 mile mark of that trip at a fixed time to hit slack in Malibu rapids otherwise you wait for another 6 hours with no where to anchor. Add to that so often up here in the summer there is no wind, or too much wind to sail. If there is good wind in Jervis inlet, it will be on your nose every leg as you wind your way up the zig zagging fjord. About the only realistic sailing plan would be to enjoy a run out of the inlet on the afternoon wind that rushes out of the mountains, of course who knows if the current at Malibu will let you out then, and during the summer the tide is usually rising in the afternoon so the current will be against you. You get the picture.

When we got our X it only had 2 - 6 gallon tanks, and while we did get by for a couple years, trip planning was based around fuel stops and more than once we got dangerously low on fuel. With the tides and currents what they are, the Northwest isn't a place you want to run our of gas and be forced to sail to the next fuel dock. Almost all fuel docks are tucked way inside the marinas which are by design sheltered from winds so sailing in for gas would be a real challenge. At the very least I would add another 3-6 gallons of capacity. If you can't fit it in the locker just carry a 5 gallon jerry can of gas on the transom.

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