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26M Mooring question

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26M Mooring question

Postby Bobglas » Thu Apr 20, 2017 7:51 am

Planning to moor the boat on Lake Champlain (avoid a 250 mile haul) this Summer. The 26M only has the two cleats on the bow, no skene chock (fairlead?). I worry that the pendants will chafe if just attached to the cleats. The boat will be left at most for two weeks at a time, hopefully less. Anyone w/ mooring experience?
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby Seapup » Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:30 pm

Tublar webbing makes good chafe protection, I use it on my dock lines where they used to chafe.

Image

http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/p/chafe-gear.html
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby Norca » Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:47 pm

I keep the boat on a mooring.
I tie up to the starboard cleat and lead the pennant out thru the anchor roller.
Never had a problem with chafe, even when the boat swing back and forth
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby NiceAft » Thu Apr 20, 2017 7:27 pm

The first year I had my :macm: , I moored it for two weeks in Lake George. I had no problem with chaffing what so ever, and I took no special precautions with fancy tying strategies . I believe you're concern is well intended, but you needn't worry. Due your due diligence, and be aware if there is any severe movement. There will always be some swinging.

I do recommend that you get one of these. Image It makes grabbing the mooring line when coming in much easier.

Ray
Last edited by NiceAft on Fri Apr 21, 2017 8:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby Y.B.Normal » Fri Apr 21, 2017 8:04 am

I've kept my 26M on a mooring for 8 years without a problem. I also lead the line from the stbd cleat through the anchor roller. I moored it with one rudder down to reduce the amount of growth on the rudders. The only problem that's developed is the bolt holes in the steering rods have elongated; I hope to eliminate this by installing rod end bearings at the end of the tubes.
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby Bobglas » Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:19 pm

Y.B.Normal wrote:I've kept my 26M on a mooring for 8 years without a problem. I also lead the line from the stbd cleat through the anchor roller. I moored it with one rudder down to reduce the amount of growth on the rudders. The only problem that's developed is the bolt holes in the steering rods have elongated; I hope to eliminate this by installing rod end bearings at the end of the tubes.

Why the rudder down?
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby NiceAft » Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:30 pm

With the rudder down, or the daggerboard down, it will slow up any swinging. It will not eliminate swinging, but slow it down.

I never thought it important to slow up swinging. It will do what it's going to do. :)

As to preventing growth, I don't think it will work.

Ray
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby Highlander » Fri Apr 21, 2017 6:33 pm

yep I tink a D/B halfway down is a good Idea depending on water depth & tides :o which I,ll have to concentrate on more being in the NWP now ! :)

J 8)
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby bwygirl » Wed Apr 26, 2017 2:03 pm

If you are going to leave your boat on a mooring pin, use you trailer eye on the bow. If you have a dock slip you can get line protectors.
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby Bobglas » Wed Apr 26, 2017 3:27 pm

Yeah, trailer eye would totally eliminate chafe (carabiner?). I thought about that but had read that the trailer eyes were susceptible ( weak)to forces that were not in line. I worry too much? :cry:
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby Bluenote » Wed Apr 26, 2017 9:39 pm

I have had no problems for the last 9 years of mooring using the trailer eye or padeye. I use a bridle tied with 10mm dynamic rope and a float or fender tied to that as a pick up buoy. Tie the bridle with double headed figure 8's as a back up for chafe protection. Some of my set ups have included a snubber tied into the bridle.

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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby Neo » Thu Apr 27, 2017 6:39 am

The great thing about a swing mooring is that you swing and face the wind .... Why would you want to fight that?

I use two 15mm Dyneema Rope loops/slings. One off the port bow and one off the starboard bow..... My slings are both about a meter (2 meters of rope) long and I loop them both through the mooring eye and then onto the bow cleats. The two loops share the load and Dyneema does not chafe easily so it would take a Loooooong time to wear through both.
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby Catigale » Sun May 07, 2017 5:21 am

We anchor a week at a time in Cuttyhunk through our anchor roller. I wrap the rode with a short piece of line to protect it from the metal of the roller
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby RussMT » Sun May 07, 2017 3:05 pm

Years ago, a Noreaster hit Raritan Bay. In Atlantic Highlands, 24 boats broke loose from their moorings, and were scattered all over the municipal marina’s shore and along the shores of Sandy Hook Bay. A large number sank or were totaled. Some were high and dry on the rocks, others on beaches, and still others in the grass along the shoreline. Three boats were destroyed when they slammed into the Earl Navy Weapons pier. At Keyport, four boats broke loose, and 11at the Raritan Yacht Club with one sunk and several others likely totaled. At Great Kills, it was also a disaster with 18 boats leaving their moorings.

Below is the report from the analsys of mooring failures and why their moorings failed.

Raritan Yacht Club
From the Fleet Captain
Howard A. Paul

Over the last few years, early September, around Labor Day, has brought some significant and surprise storms to Raritan Bay. A number of years ago, a squall came through and delivered 80 kt. winds to the bay. A race was underway and quite a number of boats were caught by surprise. One of our boats was just coming into the bay, returning from Long Island Sound and was met with a mini-tsunami with a 6’ square wave, which knocked the boat down! Unlike that storm, this September storm was less intense, however its duration was much longer. At 0600 on September 1, 2006 Raritan Bay was hit with 25 kt winds that, over the next 36 hours, built to 46 kts (with gusts to 54). At 1800 hrs on September 3 the winds abruptly dropped to 5 kts, and it was over

This was, as far as I can recall, the worst storm to hit the bay in over 10 and possibly 15 years. It produced wave heights in the fleet of 4-6 feet continuously.
Keyport Yacht Club’s preliminary report was 5 boats lost or sunk and 23 damaged. Atlantic Highlands Yacht Club reported 24 boats broke free and 14 sunk. Richmond County, a hurricane hole, reported 17 boats broke free and 2 sunk.

At Raritan Yacht Club (RYC), 11 boats broke away sustaining from light to total damage and one boat sank. One boat, once it broke free, became entangled in the mooring lines of another and inflicted serious damage to itself and the other boat . One boat dragged colliding with another and sustained serious damage. Five boats had their jibs unfurl, putting the boat and the boats nearby at risk. Significantly, none of the boats with unfurled jibs and none of the boats with mains that opened broke away. At least 12 boats had failure of one pennant, but still had the second line intact but not enough to break away. One was down to one strand of its remaining pennant.

Some boats dragged, however, only in one case was this serious. Most boats dragged less than a boat length and have been, or soon will be, repositioned. I have asked the launch drivers to continue to let me know of any boats who have proximity problems or who appear to be out of place. I have additionally asked the launch drivers to make visual inspections of pennants when they traverse the fleet.

Below is my inspection report on the fleet and damage sustained. In some cases, lines could not be examined. For the most part, lines were retrieved or the remaining lines on the mooring were examined. In some cases, lines were examined under 20x magnification to determine if chafe or thermal failure was present.

XXX: mooring was not located and may be sunk. There were no pennants on the boat to examine. There are no conclusions, as yet, to explain its breakaway.

XXX: mooring could not be located

XXX: sustained damage such that one of its cleats tore out of the boat leaving it with only one remaining pennant. The one remaining pennant failed. It appears that chafe is a significant factor in the remaining pennant’s failure. One of the three strands was cut by chafe. Examination of the break does not indicate that heat was a factor and there is a uniform edge at the site of the break, implicating chafe. The remaining two strands then failed. This vessel has cleats on the gunwale. The failure occurred below the splice, making it appear that that splice had failed due to unweaving. After inspection it was concluded that the line failed below the splice, leading to its coming apart.
XXX: the pennants were examined. They have blue bottom paint on the lines, and may have been wrapped. The line failure was caused by the boat’s bow sawing on the lines as it reacted to severe wave action, cutting its own pennants.
XXX: this is the second break away for this boat. The remaining pennants on its mooring were examined and it appears that there is a chafe point in the vicinity of the bow chocks causing chafe and the severing of the lines. Line from the boat was later examined, confirming this.
XXX: has been reported sunk. I was not able to find its mooring and inspect the remains of the pennants. No conclusions are yet available.
XXX: was found just prior to its being removed to Lockwoods Boat Yard. I was able to speak with its owner and examine the pennants. The pennants were not crossed on the bow, leading to a severe and unfair lead, which caused excessive chafe and the failure of the line.
XXX: could not be visited, due to its current location on the other side of the train bridge. No conclusions can, as yet, be drawn.
XXX: the remains of pennants were examined at the mooring. Visible chafe was seen leading to line failure. It suffered a chock failure which presented a sharp edge to the pennants. It came to rest on the other side of the train bridge on a rock pile.
XXX : pennants were examined. They were cut by the Bob-Stay. There was no chafe protection at the Bob-Stay, only near the bow chocks.
XXX: pennants were examined. The lines were cut by abrasion from the bow-mounted anchor.
XXX: lines chaffed through where they were led through the line hole in the toe rail.

A number of other boats suffered damaged lines. These boats still had one or a partial pennant remaining and did not break away.

XXX: only the port cleat had a safety tie. The starboard pennant came off its cleat.
XXX: one pennant severed by chafe from the Bob-Stay. May have been wrapped, leading to a severe line angle.
XXX: dragged and was down to one strand of triple braid. Chafe is implicated.
XXX: lost a pennant due to chafe on its Bob-Stay.
XXX: had its anchor become dislodged from its bow mounts which failed. (Numerous boats had their bow mounts fail). The dangling anchor severed a pennant.
XXX: lost its stem head fitting leading the anchor to drop and foul its pennants, severing one of them. Its jib also unfurled.
XXX: had its jib unfurl and shred. Pennants intact.
XXX: had its jib unfurl and shred. The jib was securely tied. If your jib is not wrapped tightly, even a small pocket can catch the wind and cause the jib to unfurl and shred.
XXX: has a stainless fitting at the chock. It has a 90-degree bend and presented a hard edge. While the pennants were intact, chafe was apparent and failure would have occurred had the storm not abated.
XXX: has significant chafe at its port chock.
XXX: had its anchor become un-secure and drop placing its pennants in danger.
XXX: lost a pennant. The line was cut. Examination of the boat did not reveal any visible point that could have caused it; nonetheless, it is a chafe failure, not a line failure due to excessive heat leading the line to explode.
XXX: gets the good luck award. Its jib opened and shred and its anchor mount failed causing it to drop and chafe through one of its pennants. It still stayed on its mooring
XXX: suffered bow damage due to compression. The pennants caused the bow to compress and left a gash. The lines remained intact and did not chafe.

I have photographic data of all of the above and have prepared a power point presentation for review. It is well worth viewing by all members of the club and would be a good tutorial for all new members who plan to place boats in the fleet.

While this was a very severe storm, it is regrettable to say that a good bit of the loss could have been mitigated by better preparation on the part of club members. We need to do a better job with chafe protection. Chafe at the bow chock or at the gunwale or toe rail line hole was the primary reason for most failures. Make sure your lines are crossed where possible and appropriate for your boat. Not doing so leads to an acute angle at the chock which will lead to line failure. Make sure that your chafe gear is in good shape with no tears. Make sure that there are no rough edges, either at the chock, cleat or deck, to saw through your line.

DO NOT LEAVE YOUR ANCHOR ON THE BOW! MAKE SURE YOUR BOB-STAY HAS CHAFE GEAR OR A ROLLER TO PROTECT YOUR PENNANTS. Nine boats were either lost or in jeopardy due to these preventable situations. In my previous letters to the club I have repeatedly warned members to remove their bow-hung anchors. Almost all of the bow brackets failed leading the anchor to dangle, damaging the boat and, in many cases, cutting the lines.

Members have been asked to provide a safety tie for their jibs. Some boats, even with a safety tie, had their jibs unfurl. When you secure and furl your jib it is good practice to cleat off the furling line and take your pennants and place them on your primary winches. Winch in the lines so that the jib unfurls a few wraps. Remove the lines from the winch and then re-furl the jib, leaving a tight wrap. This should insure that there are no pockets that can catch the wind and rip the sail. Always sight up the jib and if any visible pockets are noticeable, re-furl the sail.

Considering the size of our fleet and the carnage suffered by all clubs on the bay, we did well. Over the years, we have put a great deal of effort into improving RYC’s mooring standards. At this point, our lines are strong enough to have some boats begin to break up. Very few boats dragged and of those that did, most dragged for only a short distance. Our standards can only go so far in protecting your boat. Our mooring providers have done an outstanding job in providing safe and reliable moorings and lines. We will continue to review our standards and improve them. We will be discussing asking members with boats over 35’ to insure that their bow chocks will support a 1” line and chafe gear. The mooring committee, in preparation for next sailing season, will discuss this idea, as well as others. The rest is up to each club member. Please remember, the boat you save may be your own, however, if you break away, you put every boat in your path in danger. Good seamanship and being a good neighbor are synonymous when on your mooring.

This was not a hurricane. The damage of this storm came from its duration. The storm and hurricane season is far from over. Inspect your boats and your pennants. Make sure your anchors are stowed and check that your chafe gear is robust. Let’s hope the balance of this sailing season is fun, safe and secure.
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Re: 26M Mooring question

Postby Y.B.Normal » Sun May 07, 2017 4:33 pm

The reason I want to reduce swing is that the boats in the mooring field are relatively close together and can hit each other if they don't swing together. Most of the other boats are keelboats which take longer to swing with wind changes than mine does. What compounds the situation is I'm on a river; the current also influences the boats and sometimes causes them to swing in different directions.

Alternating rudders in the water reduces the amount of growth on each rudder as they're out of the water longer.
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