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Hooking up my trailer

Posted: Tue Feb 09, 2016 6:23 pm
by romandesign
Hi, I'm a new owner of 26D which sits on my driveway, newer towed it yet. I'm not sure how to hook everything up mechanically. There is a ball, obviously, and two safety chains that I'm told are hooked to eyelets on the hitch. There is a thin metal wire with hooks on both ends, and a little metal arm on a top of the trailer-side hitch assembly. I think it's supposed to activate emergency break, but I'm not sure how and where to hook it. Any advice appreciated.

Re: Hooking up my trailer

Posted: Tue Feb 09, 2016 7:53 pm
by Dragos Filimon
Just hook it on one of the eyelets. If safety chains are broken, will activate the brake. And do not forget of safety pin on ball hookup.

Re: Hooking up my trailer

Posted: Tue Feb 09, 2016 9:36 pm
by romandesign
Thanks! Which safety pin do you mean? There is one where across the pin that connects ball arm to the hitch. The ball as I understand is secured but unscrewing the knob on the trailer, lowering thailer to the ball, and screwing it in. Correct?

Re: Hooking up my trailer

Posted: Tue Feb 09, 2016 10:23 pm
by Dragos Filimon

Re: Hooking up my trailer

Posted: Tue Feb 09, 2016 11:18 pm
by Herschel
Here is a Utube video that is pretty good, too.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=yo ... FORM=VIRE6

One bit of advice. As the guy in the video alludes to, keeping the trailer lights working is a constant challenge. Remembering to unplug the lights before launching, especially if your bulbs are incandescent, will keep from burning the bulbs out when you put on the breaks. When the lights don't come on as expected, it is often a ground problem due to rust or unwanted paint some where. Keeping the inside of the hitch that receives the ball scraped clear of paint and rust helps maintain a good ground connection. Jiggling the bulbs in their sockets can clear up a connection problem sometimes, too.

Re: Hooking up my trailer

Posted: Wed Feb 10, 2016 12:35 am
by 1st Sail
Be sure to cross the safety chains when attaching to your hitch.
Remove as much slack as possible however, allow enough slack in order to make a full turn with out tensioning the chains.
Regarding trailer lights I swapped mine for all LED which eliminated the need to disconnect the power when launching and replacing broken bulbs from leaking tail lights.
Depending on the age of the trailer I would inspect the bearings and hubs. Check for proper lubrication and condition of the seals.
Bearing Buddys are a worth while investment to protect your bearings and spindles.
Enjoy your new boat!

Re: Hooking up my trailer

Posted: Wed Feb 10, 2016 5:49 pm
by Herschel
Depending on the age of the trailer I would inspect the bearings and hubs. Check for proper lubrication and condition of the seals.
:)
Amen, to that and much more! But that reminds me about checking the condition of the serge brakes. I have a 18 year old trailer, and, despite infrequent launchings, the drum breaks finally just rusted out and were useless. I replaced them with disk brakes and have them checked annually by the shop that services my Yamaha. Good to take a good look at them or have them serviced by a tech that knows trailer brakes.

Re: Hooking up my trailer

Posted: Wed Feb 10, 2016 6:54 pm
by romandesign
Thanks guys.

Re: Hooking up my trailer

Posted: Wed Feb 10, 2016 10:57 pm
by 1st Sail
? Does your trailer have hydraulic breaks? Drum or Disc? I not familiar with the older Mac trailers but can only make recommendations based on my '06 trailer.
In the event you have breaks I recommend you replace your break fluid. You should have a bleed valve on the brake casting for each break.
1. park the trailer on level ground
2. measure from ground to the bleed valve port
3. lower the tongue so the break cylinder reservoir is physically below the bleed valve height when measured from the ground. this is necessary in order for any air bubbles to move toward the cylinder when you stop to refill the reservoir. It is not absolutely necessary but if you do not have power bleeder or anyone to assist it will save you a little time and fluid.
4. remove reservoir fill cap and note fluid level when topped of
5. locate the manual actuator lever (mine is in front of the cylinder and accessed thru a hole on the underside of the tongue).
6. using a flat screw driver actuate the lever to compress the cylinder plunger
7. place a bleed hose (clear) over the bleed valve that is the greatest distance from the cylinder. Determine the distance by tracing the brake line(s) and locate visually or measure the total distance of each line from the cylinder to the brake
8. place the bleed hose in a container and open the valve i.e. use a clear water bottle so you can observe the particulate in the fluid as you bleed.
9. observe the fluid color when you start the bleed process (usually amber shade), note the suspended particulate
10. cycle the bleed process by manually actuating the cylinder lever, continue to top off the reservoir with fresh fluid, NEVER allow the reservoir to pump dry as you will pump air into your lines.
11. repeat the bleed cycle for each individual brake until the it runs clear with fresh fluid, no particulate is suspended in the discharge, and the discharge is free of air bubbles. Note: using a clear hose you will be able to observe the fluid color, spot suspended particulate, and air bubbles.
12. Once the bleed is complete tighten the bleed valve and proceed to the remaining break and repeat.
13. test drive the trailer and stop several times to actuate the break cylinder. check the bleed valves for leaks. Recheck the fluid level in the reservoir.
14. float the boat, park the trailer, go sailing!
Depending on the make an model of your trailer you may be able to secure documentation and part from UFP (Universal Functional Products). I purchased my replacement cylinder and tongue assembly from them. A little more $ but a lot less hassle than rebuilding the cylinder.

Re: Hooking up my trailer

Posted: Thu Feb 11, 2016 12:26 pm
by romandesign
Thanks, good to know.

Re: Hooking up my trailer

Posted: Thu Feb 11, 2016 3:35 pm
by Herschel
Had one of those stray thoughts today when I came on the board and noticed some additional help with the trailer topic. I'll offer this analogy and hope my Admiral doesn't go on this forum anytime soon and read it! :D Here it is. We fall in love with our "new" boat. We sink as much discretionary money into her as we think we can afford (or get away with). There it sits on the trailer. We don't even notice the trailer very much at first. Our tendency is to focus just about all of our attention on our new "sweetie pie", the boat. We can't wait to get our hands all over her! But, folks, the trailer is like the mother-in-law that comes with our sweetie. We ignore it at our peril! No, its not the main deal, but it is part of the package! If we give it the attention and support it needs, it will return that support and rarely if ever let us down, but just try to park it away out of sight and out of mind, and when you need to have its support the most, it will turn on you! :cry: