Singlehanding Dangerous???

A forum for discussion of how to rig and tune your boat or kicker to achieve the best sailing performance.

Moderators: Catigale, Paul S, Heath_Mod, beene, Hamin' X, kmclemore, tangentair

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Randy McCotter
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Location: Slave Lake Alberta Canada..... "Mari-Jacq"..... 2002 Mac 26X

Post by Randy McCotter » Tue Aug 07, 2007 10:49 pm

The good thing with your boat marc is it's blue which means if you fall overboard, it's not moving that fast and you can swim over and climb back on. OOOOOO....... the race is on.

Randy.

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MARK PASSMORE
First Officer
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Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2007 8:38 pm
Location: Lake Lanier GA - 07 MAC 26M YAMAHA T60 "faster blue hull"

Post by MARK PASSMORE » Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:20 pm

I wonder when Jack Sparrow will be painting his hull blue. With all the weight from those extra mods, I would think he would need the extra speed.
:wink:

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ALX357
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Location: Nashville TN -- 2000 MacGregor 26X, Mercury two-stroke 50hp

Post by ALX357 » Tue Sep 04, 2007 9:52 pm

The bow lifelines can be relocated to the top of the rail, using some simple ss hardware to put eyes there, if the Genny is raised a bit. Whatever loss there is of performance by having the Genoa higher and whatever extra heeling forces there are, is completely overshadowed by the advantage of being able to see forward and sideways under it. No more blind spot. The stock lifelines are long enough to reach the bow pulpit at the top of the rail, if you add some snap shackle or pelican hook hardware at the cockpit pulpit, which also will make it easy to lower the lifeline for the spreaders to for when the mast is down.

There would be a way to string some netting between the lifelines and the deck level, if you ran a wire or line from the bottom of the bow pulpit and thru the stanchion support gussets, and strung the netting between that line and the lifelines above. Prolly would look too busy, but it would add some security from the life-line level down.

Frank C

Post by Frank C » Wed Sep 05, 2007 4:37 am

MarcD wrote:I have sailed . . . about 90% of the time it has been on my own. I wear a regulated life vest with a lanyard, which i clip on to the life lines when I go forward . . .
Welcome aboard, Mark! :!:
Should Fate or Neptune choose to drop you over the side while clipped to that lifeline:
- would you be suspended or swimming?
- could you hoist yourself back aboard?
- could you "unclip" if you were being dragged under?

Hope you've done the analysis. Some guys feel it's better to be untethered, and trailing a long line behind the boat. I'd want the short tether to prevent me going over the side, even if that meant just hands 'n knees while on the foredeck deck.

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tangentair
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Post by tangentair » Wed Sep 05, 2007 10:20 am

I am with Frank on the short lead but I would add that I have found that sitting on or standing in the open front hatch, I can reach just about all of the bow hardware, I seldom have had a need to go up on the cabin top when under way. (and that is how Bill taught me to hank on the jib after he ran the lines aft). I will be adding a hand rail opposite the head area (on an M) just to aid getting back off the V when seas (lakes) are rough.

Rigging my M for single handing this winter will include a main downhaul run aft and main sail lazy jacks. There is a good mod on this http://macgregorsailors.com/cgi-bin/mod ... record=298
I am looking at the mackpack http://macksails.com/mackpack.htm 'cause I need a sail cover also

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mike uk
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Location: England 26X

Post by mike uk » Wed Sep 05, 2007 11:24 am

Harnesses should not be attached to lifelines.

The stanchions are not designed for the load that could be put on them (bear in mind there would be a significant leverage effect).

Harnesses should instead be secured to strong points - cleats, padeyes, etc. Admittedly the size of washers underneath the Mac cleats leaves something to be desired but at least there is virtually no leverage on cleats.

Mike

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R Rae
First Officer
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Post by R Rae » Wed Sep 05, 2007 5:54 pm

John, after this abundance of super advice, about the only important item missing (IMHO) is a scheduled 'flight plan' that you would share with the Admiral.
With the plan should be agreed upon times you will pick up the cell phone and simply 'call in'. ie. When you clear the harbour, and when you reach the turnaround point. etc, etc, etc.

This has worked well for us these past three seasons.

Good luck

Ron

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beene
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Location: Ontario Canada, '07 26M, Merc 75 4s PEGASUS

Post by beene » Wed Sep 05, 2007 7:07 pm

Don't you mean...

"FLOAT PLAN"

8)

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pokerrick1
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Location: Las Vegas, NV (Henderson, near Lake Mead)

No teather

Post by pokerrick1 » Wed Sep 05, 2007 8:50 pm

I've decided to wear my PFD when sailing (single or not) but not to teather to anything with ANY length, long nor short. I decided I would rather float and bob freely than be "dragged" along. The boat should eventually point into the wind and stop by itself anyway - - - right???

Rick :) :macm:

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beene
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Post by beene » Thu Sep 06, 2007 2:35 pm

I don't like to be tied to anything while on my boat.

However, I would recommend dragging a long line off the transom when sailing singlehanded to help you stay with the boat should you end up overboard unexpectedly. :|

G

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tangentair
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Post by tangentair » Thu Sep 06, 2007 2:57 pm

Problem with long lines - other than they catch and tangle on every remote opportunity - is that they are in the water. IMHO staying on the boat is preferred when the water is cold enough to induce hypothermia, the hit from the boom was enough to knock you senseless, the cell phone isn't in a watertight bag, any swiming is involved (I don't), the engine is running and boarding would require using the swim ladder, and a few others but you get the picture. If you need to get used to a short tether, marry a high maintenance wife or stop over for a few hours and mine will tweek you up to speed quickly.

eric3a

Post by eric3a » Thu Sep 06, 2007 3:48 pm

..
Last edited by eric3a on Tue Mar 11, 2008 10:55 am, edited 1 time in total.

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beene
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Post by beene » Thu Sep 06, 2007 6:38 pm

Good one Eric 8)
So far.... no takers :D
But I will continue trolling.... :arrow:

and...
they catch and tangle on every remote opportunity
On what? I am sailing in the lake... other than snagging on what Eric mentioned... :|
is that they are in the water
I thought that was the whole point.... when you get knocked/thrown overboard :?:
Maybe I missed something...
the engine is running and boarding would require using the swim ladder,
I said when I am sailing.... do you run the motor when sailing :?:
If you need to get used to a short tether, marry a high maintenance wife or stop over for a few hours and mine will tweek you up to speed quickly
:o
No thanks... think I'll stick with what I've got now.... I say "Honey I'm going on a boat trip for a few days with the guys, see you when I get back".... and she says "have a nice time and be sure to have a great time, say hi to the guys for me"
:)

I have spent many years sailing singlehanded sailing and dragging a line from the stern. I have practiced MOB with the sails up in moderate winds and the boat tacks, by itself, back and forth. With the line in the water trailing behind her, I can grab on and slowly pull us back together and reenter the cockpit, get dried off, warm up, and start sailing again.

G

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pokerrick1
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power boats

Post by pokerrick1 » Thu Sep 06, 2007 9:01 pm

eric3a wrote: And as a bonus you can really mess up the prop of power boats crossing too close behind you...

Eric
I wish the hull they would cross behind me - - - but they always seem to want to cross in FRONT - - - the BAS_ _ _ _ S!

Rick :) :macm:

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tangentair
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Post by tangentair » Thu Sep 06, 2007 9:29 pm

beene wrote:I thought that was the whole point.... when you get knocked/thrown overboard
Maybe I missed something...
yeah the point of a short tether attached so you can not go overboard is that you do not end up in the water. But hey what ever floats your boat, at least your thinking and have an action plan, instead of wondering what to do when sh#t happens.

And we all have great wives, my first drove me to drink and I never thanked her properly.

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