Rudders and awlgrip.

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Ixneigh
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Rudders and awlgrip.

Post by Ixneigh » Tue Oct 02, 2018 7:31 am

New rudders are on. The bronze bushing for the pivot bolt is a must. I used half inch bolts also. Big improvement. I was going to do that even with the plastic rudders.
Awlgrip... best left to professionals.
Last year, I made opening ports that were direct drop ins for a top window opening. However. I had problems with sealing the frames to the cabin side, and they leaked. I decided to fiberglass the frames right to the cabin side. Once the project was complete, and faired, a friend convinced me to use awlgrip paint instead of black gel coat to finish the area. *my intent was to do the entire black stripe since it had faded badly*
So I said ok fine. I bought a new gas mask style filter mask. Spent 90 on a pint of paint and activator. A quart was only a bit more, but was way more paint that I needed, and it has a limited shelf life. Primed both stripes with grey epoxy interlux primer. My friend and I then tried a few test spots. Reason number one not to DYI: every tiny defect in the surface was very conspicuous. It would take several more days of filling and sanding to get automotive quality finish. We were at odds with thinning. This paint is already thin. It has picky handling characteristics. He thins it down even more to water-like consistency and puts on at least three coats. He uses special foam rollers, and lots of foam brushes since the paint desolves them. I wasnt going to do all that work. So he bails. I will carry on myself. I decide to put on as thick a base coat as i can, to cover the imperfections (the surface, if painted with the one part boat paint sold at west marine, that I normally use, would have been nearly flawless)
So, reason 2. The paint is terribly toxic and smelly. I'm told one really needs a forced air system to do it safely. The mask did remove the smell. Though I still had a mild headache after. You must mix the two parts, then apply it in about half an hour. Thinning will increase working time. I used a plain disposable brush, the same I use for fiberglass work, but I did remove all loose bristles. I would use a better brush next time, but it worked ok and didnt turn soggy. I brushed horizontally and turn up and down. Took a bit of practice to not have sags. This paint is famous for those. When done, the job didnt look that great up close. It did cover the imperfections in the surface. But heavy brushmarks were visible. But from ten feet away, it looked fantastic. Black black black, even glossier then the OEM finish. It could use sanding and a second coat with a high quality brush and properly thinned paint. But I'm not going to do that till next year. It already looks better than its looked since new (from ten feet away ;) :D ) I cleaned up and disposed of a pile of gloves, tape, and mixing containers (reason three, you will go through a lot of these) and called it a job.

Take away.
I am a fair painter but never used this paint before now. I wouldnt really recommend it for casual use. Its way more toxic then the average stuff consumers use on boats. I'll have a forced air set up next time I use it (scuba tank)
All the stuff you need for a perfect job is expensive and you have to have it. Bunch of mini foam rollers. Bunch of foam brushes. Several for each coat. The special thinner. The face mask and lots of gloves.
The surface to be painted really has to be perfectly smooth. After my friend, who IS a professional painter, thinned the paint to his liking, spiderweb cracks UNDER THE PRIMER were still faintly visible. Unthinned, the paint covered those. Adhesive power on faded un prepped gel coat, skin, tools, metal fittings and rubber gunwale strip is excellent. :p

Ix

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Herschel
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Re: Rudders and awlgrip.

Post by Herschel » Wed Oct 03, 2018 8:05 am

I appreciate your sharing this experience. After multiple uses of NewglassII on my 20-year old black stripe, I am ready to pull the "trigger" on paint, too. For just the stripe. What paint would you recommend, if you had it to do over? :?

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topcat0399
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Re: Rudders and awlgrip.

Post by topcat0399 » Wed Oct 03, 2018 9:58 am

The horror!

Think I'll stick to my industrial acrylic enamel from Ace.


And you have convinced me to bush my lower blade pivot......

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Ixneigh
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Sailboat: MacGregor 26M
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Re: Rudders and awlgrip.

Post by Ixneigh » Wed Oct 03, 2018 5:45 pm

Re what what would I use

There is no question that awlgrip is the final answer. In not only gloss and fade resistance, but adhesion. I have mixed feelings. Gelgoat is easier for sure. But it will fade in a few years. however, if if lasted 20 years for you...
I know I could get a much better finish, near factory probably, with a first class brush. A resin brush is a big NO! but, since the surface was sub par, I didnt care. I could sand, retape, and use a 20 dollar brush, and get very good results. Even if I used a 20 dollar brush on each side, it would be worth It. The pros use the foam rollers and brushes. One rolls, the other tips the bubbles. They do million dollar yachts this way. I'd prefer to do it myself on small areas. The cabin has ports to work around also. Foam brushes dont deal with obstacles as well as bristle brushes In my opinion
And I've gotten more runs using them. The stuff sands ok too. Not like epoxy, which is hard. So if you do mess up it's not like big runs with resin, hard to sand. So, I will stick with the awlgrip for now. I will sand the stripes next season, get them as smooth as possible, and use a good brush. If you dont live in the tropics, black gelcoat is easier cheaper and can be wet sanded and compounded for ultra smooth finish. I'm using white gelcoat to touch up the white gelcoat parts.
As in aside, I havent had luck "painting over" the spiderweb cracks with gelcoat. For some reason regular paint worked better, and awlgrip covers them completely. (Except if you thin it way down. I'm not doing that, and the pros can laugh if they want. One thick coat, sand the brush marks out. And one thinned coat to restore the gloss. That's the way I'm doing it) from then on you probably only need one thin coat every five years if the immroned silver mast paint I used on my 23 was any indication.

Ix

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