Checking the forestay tension

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Tomfoolery
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Location: Rochester, NY '99X BF50 'Tomfoolery'

Re: Checking the forestay tension

Post by Tomfoolery » Fri Mar 15, 2019 6:34 am

Neo wrote:
March wrote:I always check very carefully the connections to the roller furler, both ends, before launching, making sure the crimps are in place and no stray wires show.
Now here's a process I need to implement too :wink:
Sounds like you :macx: guys have a tough time attaching the forestay :| .... No Backstay on an :macm: so when the rigging is all set up correctly attaching the forestay is not so bad. 8)
I would have thought the :macm: forestay would be even harder to attach, since the shrouds are swept back further than on the :macx: . :|

The backstay gets attached after the rig is up and tight, otherwise we'd never get the forestay pinned. I have a turnbuckle on the backstay, so I loosen it up sloppy when I disconnect, and it reconnects easily. A few seconds of spinning the turnbuckle, holding the stay itself from rotating with one hand and turning the turnbuckle with the other, and it's good to go.

I don't worry about it loosening, as it would take a lot of turns to get anywhere with that wide angle it makes with the mast, and it's more for tuning anyway. And running under spinnaker alone, as there's no main sail and sheet to counter the forward forces, of course, and I don't want to overload the shrouds.

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Neo
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Re: Checking the forestay tension

Post by Neo » Fri Mar 15, 2019 12:36 pm

Tomfoolery wrote:I would have thought the :macm: forestay would be even harder to attach, since the shrouds are swept back further than on the :macx:
I guess if the upper stays were too tight this would be true but I just set my rigging up as instructed in the manual and all's good. It definitely doesn't take much muscle to hold the fuler drum in place while pinning the toggle to the Chin Plate.... even "mini muscle me" can do it :D

In addition to this if I find myself struggling with the drum it's an indication that something's wrong and I need to stop and work it out. Some time back the the top shackle turned and jammed before I raised the mast and I knew something was wrong when I started struggling to attach to the chin plate. I've retired that shackle (which had a couple dents on it) for a new one and all's good now days 8)

All the best.
Neo

Alexis
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Re: Checking the forestay tension

Post by Alexis » Wed Mar 20, 2019 12:37 pm

Thanks to all for your questions, answers and comments! I was surprised to see how popular is this topic!

After reading all contributions I understand that the forstay tension is roughly checked through the inclination of the mast with the deck (the infamous 94 degrees). The mast is leaning toward the aft, which means that the own rig weight should somewhat give the appropriate tension (if the side stays tension is correct).

Therefore, I am guessing that the risk is low of not having enough tension on the forestay, unless the forstay is way too long. This would be easy to tell by checking the mast leaning angle.

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dlandersson
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Re: Checking the forestay tension

Post by dlandersson » Thu Mar 21, 2019 5:26 am

Pretty much, althought, you can, by tightening the backstay, reduce the tension on the forstay if the saling conditions warrant it. 8)
Alexis wrote:Thanks to all for your questions, answers and comments! I was surprised to see how popular is this topic!

After reading all contributions I understand that the forstay tension is roughly checked through the inclination of the mast with the deck (the infamous 94 degrees). The mast is leaning toward the aft, which means that the own rig weight should somewhat give the appropriate tension (if the side stays tension is correct).

Therefore, I am guessing that the risk is low of not having enough tension on the forestay, unless the forstay is way too long. This would be easy to tell by checking the mast leaning angle.

whgoffrn
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Re: Checking the forestay tension

Post by whgoffrn » Thu Mar 21, 2019 6:13 am

Unless im incorrect in my assumption i dont think your upper and lower side stay tension can be correct without the front also being tight enough... buy a loose guage ...im not sure if i spelled that right but i got one about two years and set mine for 300 upper and lower after i bent two different sets of spreaders

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