Anchoring at Sea

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Kelly Hanson East
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Re: Anchoring at Sea

Post by Kelly Hanson East » Tue May 12, 2009 7:36 am

Thanks for that post Navyvet (and thanks for your service)

Ill bite - why dont you plan on going into that estuary and anchoring safely inland on that river - there looks to be good shallows where the Mac excels, and no one else will be zipping around at night. If you come off anchor, worst thing is having to step onto land.

Anchoring on open sea without a watch is really an expensive form of Russian roulette - even with my limited experience I can tell you people drive boats at 45-60 mph at night without lights, in dubious states of fitness-of-command up here in NY. Without trying to 'diss anyone, I suspect that FL is similar.

If tides behave, how about beaching it ??

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Love MACs
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Re: Anchoring at Sea

Post by Love MACs » Tue May 12, 2009 10:21 am

NavyVet: I certainly see the adventure and romance of anchoring at sea ( even if you only plan to go a 1/2 or so out.) We did that once in my sister's 34' Hunter off NC coast. But with her requirement that we take turn at anchor/ship watch it took a little trill out of the experience. She divided it up as there were six of us and as the night progressed, and the beer flowed, I ended up pulling three of those watches myself. :o Some things, IMHO, are just not worth the risk and the trouble of doing, but at least I can now say, "Been there, done that". 8)



Allan

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Night Sailor
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Re: Anchoring at Sea

Post by Night Sailor » Tue May 12, 2009 1:19 pm

Anchor watches are simply a part of life at sea and prudent seamanship at times and places of the skipper's choosing. They can be really nice to have for time alone to reflect on many things, and to see and hear things others don't.

I'll never forget a 3am watch on a cold, clear, windless night up in the islands off Queen Charlotte straight many years ago. The skipper had parked the 132' schooner in a deep, well protected cove. I really didn't think the anchor would drag, but in rock country, you can never be sure. I had only been on watch about 30 minutes when I was treated to a wisp of Aurora Borealis. While I was looking for more, I spotted three metors. As I was writing all this in the watch log, I heard a strange sound near the schooner's stern. I peered over the taff rail and spotted an orca rising from the water 50' away. When it suddenly blew I was startled. I was mesmerized by the sound of it's breathing, almost like a soft purring for several minutes, then it simply sank from sight. There are probably fellow sailors that to this day don't believe so much could happen on my watch and no one else's, so I fielded a lot of questions when the Captain read the log the next morning. Now I look forward to watch standing when it's necessary.

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Nautek
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Re: Anchoring at Sea

Post by Nautek » Thu May 14, 2009 1:28 am

Fishermen do it all the time

Allan

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bastonjock
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Re: Anchoring at Sea

Post by bastonjock » Thu May 14, 2009 5:26 am

JScale

you have thr same anchor set up as i have,30ft of chain and a delta anchor,my delta is 11kg which is about 25lbs,with your 35lb anchor you will not move .As c130 wrote,we spent a night in shallow water with biggish waves and force 6-7 winds,I had out all of the chain,anchor and about 150ft of rode,we bounced around all night in a very uncomfortable sea,the fun part was retrieving the anchor,i went up front,jim was on the helm,comunications were difficult,trying be heard over the wind noise was not easy either way,i sat in the pushpit and started to haul,one minute i would be looking at a wave a few inches from my face,next it was 10 feet away,up and down like a bucking horse,it was very cold very wet and down right miserable,to brake the anchor from the sea bed,i had to lock off the chain and jim guided the boat over and it broke free,i lashed it down and made my way back,it was a bit risky but the one thing that i got from our experience was confidence in the mac,the next fun part was rentering the harbour,i think that we both had our fingers crossed that nothing broke on the way in,we had the wind off our bow and i had to turn between a couple of very large buoys and then ride the surf over the sand bank.

With regard to anchor alarms,they are a great idea but you do need a speaker for them as the a a meer beep fro the CP

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jcasale
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Re: Anchoring at Sea

Post by jcasale » Thu May 14, 2009 9:24 am

KHE
I have spent a great deal of time in the shallow water you mentioned and that area is our back up plan, however that area is very heavy fished and with the number of stinkpots that zip through there my chances of being involved in a collision are much higher.

Leon
Thanks for the tip, I've felt that whiplash effect and it's not fun.

Navyvet
I was reading the chart you posted and can not find the anchorage you mentioned, do have the lat long handy? Also, I was a helo rescue swimmer for 10 years, what did you do while on active duty?

Bastonjock
C130king told me about your adventures that last time we went sailing on his mac. We were hoping for some of the same when we took his on the outside, but got nothing but dead air. I am hoping for something on between the two.
Thanks again for the tips guys. I am going to try this as soon as possible, I just got the okay from the Doctor to get underway (knee surgery sucks). Keep the ideas coming and I'll keep you posted.
John

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c130king
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Re: Anchoring at Sea

Post by c130king » Thu May 14, 2009 11:17 am

jcasale wrote:I just got the okay from the Doctor to get underway (knee surgery sucks). Keep the ideas coming and I'll keep you posted.
John
Here's an idea...drive over to the Navy base and find my boat in the MWR storage yard. Wash with soapy water then three coats of wax...okay you are still convalescing...two coats will be fine.

:wink:

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bastonjock
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Re: Anchoring at Sea

Post by bastonjock » Thu May 14, 2009 2:58 pm

c130king wrote:
jcasale wrote:I just got the okay from the Doctor to get underway (knee surgery sucks). Keep the ideas coming and I'll keep you posted.
John
Here's an idea...drive over to the Navy base and find my boat in the MWR storage yard. Wash with soapy water then three coats of wax...okay you are still convalescing...two coats will be fine.

:wink:
typical officer,trying to get the enlisted men to do the hard work :)

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bastonjock
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Re: Anchoring at Sea

Post by bastonjock » Thu May 14, 2009 3:09 pm

i have not done the moon watch but the best night time experience that i had was on a 35ft sail boat,i had driven up from the madness of london that morning all the way to Oban on Scotlands West Coast,the skipper took us out of the harbour and then i was given the helm,after he checked me on Navigation he went down below,a few moments later a small whisky was handed up to me,it was a flat calm night, the outline of the mountains on both sides and the moons shiney river,i looked up and an asteroid shower hit the atmosphere,it was nature at its finest.

and boy do i love sunset and sundown

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