Furling Jenny vs. Jib

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DaveC426913
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Furling Jenny vs. Jib

Post by DaveC426913 » Wed May 23, 2018 9:48 pm

Another thread about cabin top fairleads got me thinking about my lousy pointing.

I always have my furling jenny on, so I suppose I can't expect a no-sail zone narrower than about 120 degrees. But maybe I should see if a jib would help.

What's involved in raising a jib while I am set up for the furling jenny?

I know I could attempt a major mod to set up a cutter rig, with two forestays, but is there a less onerous way of flying the jib?

My jenny is tied at the hound, so I can't just lower it and raise a jib on the furler. (Could I rearrange it so the foresail is bound to a halyard s it can be raised an lowered?)

Other suggestions?

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sailboatmike
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Re: Furling Jenny vs. Jib

Post by sailboatmike » Thu May 24, 2018 6:28 am

Put a wire luff in the jib and use the spinnaker halyard would be the easiest way around it, you would probably be able to pick up a second hand wire luffed jib for peanuts as they are considered to be a bit old fashioned.

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Ixneigh
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Re: Furling Jenny vs. Jib

Post by Ixneigh » Thu May 24, 2018 6:28 am

If you want weather ability especially in stronger winds, a hank on jib is what you need. I mean like 20 miles dead up wind. Not just a few miles back to the dock. But going up wind like that, I mean, on a mission to Get There, sucks. If I wasn't thinking about extended cruising in some place like the Bahamas, I'd forget about it. Just have the best roller furling sail and hardware you can afford and motor sail up wind with the main up. It's faster and more comfortable. I have done everything I can to maximize sailing ability on my boat, but I sail alone and I'm insane. If I had a wife and a child or two on board, the last thing id do is try to thrash the boat to weather for an extended period.

Ix

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Re: Furling Jenny vs. Jib

Post by BOAT » Thu May 24, 2018 12:57 pm

Ixneigh wrote:If you want weather ability especially in stronger winds, a hank on jib is what you need. I mean like 20 miles dead up wind. Not just a few miles back to the dock. But going up wind like that, I mean, on a mission to Get There, sucks. If I wasn't thinking about extended cruising in some place like the Bahamas, I'd forget about it. Just have the best roller furling sail and hardware you can afford and motor sail up wind with the main up. It's faster and more comfortable. I have done everything I can to maximize sailing ability on my boat, but I sail alone and I'm insane. If I had a wife and a child or two on board, the last thing id do is try to thrash the boat to weather for an extended period.

Ix
Hey Ixneigh - I know you have experimented with this a lot - what kind of results did you get when you ran your furling genoa sheets through blocks on the cabin top? I thought you were gonna try that. Did that help? I am trying to create a set up right now with a whisker pole (deck sweeper) attached to the anchor roller plate to make my furled genoa a self tending jib but in that situation what I am actually doing is putting a boom on my foresail and pulling on that boom from a spring block on the mast base with ONE sheet so it's going to just flop back and forth like a mainsail when the boat tacks. In this configuration my idea was to use the furler more like an outhaul to set the shape of the foresail. If I am successful in pulling this off I would actually be able to sheet in the foresail all the way to mid ships. Now, I really don't know if that is going to improve my pointing (and really, pointing is not why I am doing this - I am doing it to create a completely self tending configuration for 'boat' that will allow 'boat' to sail upwind at night time completely on the auto pilot in wind mode with no attention needed. There is this leg from Long Beach to Catalina where I would like to sail all night so I can make my mooring early in the morning and I want to allow the waypoints to set the tacks instead of me doing it every 30 minutes.) I have not measured the difference in degrees when pointing - have you got any pointing degrees or tested any angles?

I'm just curious what results anyone has got using the deck tracks on a furled genoa. I admit a working jib is much better but my issue is self tending, not performance - so I was trying to get some numbers.

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Ixneigh
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Re: Furling Jenny vs. Jib

Post by Ixneigh » Thu May 24, 2018 4:52 pm

The thought of sailing at night with autopilot terrifies me :wink:
I didn't think it set well at all. But once you roll the Jenny past a certain point, it's going to be baggy. A better lead angle won't really help.
I had the self tacking jib on my venture. It was factory, and worked ok but still didn't set perfectly. It lacked a track, called a job horse in the old days.

Ix

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Re: Furling Jenny vs. Jib

Post by BOAT » Thu May 24, 2018 5:04 pm

Well, I can't put on a hank jib with that furler on there.

I guess I have nothing to lose by trying - I have a few spring blocks laying around so it's not a big cost to try it.

As for sailing at night - it's really no big deal out in the ocean - there is nothing out there. There is an occasional big ship but they are easy to see at night and make a pretty good mark on the AIS plotter not to mention the collision alarm that makes a crappy noise anytime it 'thinks' something is going to come within 1000 feet of the boat.

I'm not afraid to be out in the pacific at night - it's no more dangerous than in the day time. Now, FLORIDA? Yeah, I can see that - the bottom pops shallow a lot over there and there is a lot of traffic. The weather is also a little more tricky on the east coast. Over here the calmest part of the day on the water is at night. Sailing to Catalina at night is totally safe - people do it all the time.

The only problem is that often the wind is coming right at you if your pointing to Two Harbors - so you need to tack - and the fastest route is to tack OFTEN on that particular leg.

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Re: Furling Jenny vs. Jib

Post by Highlander » Thu May 24, 2018 8:32 pm

OK so u mount a pad eye in front of ur bow hatch like I did then u can mount an up-haul & pulley to the lower shroud swivel brkt , have a forestay made to desired length attach all & tighten up with up-haul install small storm jib ur desired size & attach a modified boat hook to padeye & jib tack & u r good to go I,ve done this already & still have the storm jib forestay around somewhere if u need the measurements ! I used a Johnston tension-er to snug up the forestay


Other option is to move furler ahead approx 1ft on small bowsprit & use a Johnstone tensioner then use a reg hank -on jib & forestay with a padeye for ur jib boom boat hook ?

J 8)
PS of coarse u gonna have to add another up-haul unless u can use ur spin one

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